Aqua Pennsylvania steps in to rehabilitate troubled Sun Valley water system


By Marc Lucca, Aqua Pennsylvania President

As a leader in the water and wastewater industry, Aqua is committed to improving our nation’s infrastructure through thoughtful capital investment, which improves customer service and satisfaction. Over the past five years, Aqua Pennsylvania has invested $1.16 billion in infrastructure improvements, including hundreds of miles of pipe replacement and plant upgrades to enhance water quality and ensure reliable water and wastewater services. In 2018, Pennsylvania plans to invest more than $238.8 million to strengthen infrastructure in the communities we have the privilege of serving. 

One of Aqua’s investment focuses is partnering with municipalities that are struggling to maintain their own water or wastewater systems – whether because of water quality issues, critical infrastructure investment needs, or budgetary constraints. By leveraging our compliance expertise, purchasing power and operational efficiencies, our company is able to infuse needed capital into systems and develop the infrastructure required for clean drinking water and environmentally sound wastewater services.

Aqua Operator outside the existing Sun Valley well station.

Given our reputation for bringing troubled systems into compliance with environmental regulations to ensure public health, State Rep. Jack Rader and Sen. Mario Scavello recently asked Aqua Pennsylvania to consider taking over the small but troubled Sun Valley water system. The system, which serves approximately 200 residents in Chestnut Hill Township, Monroe County, did not have any consistent oversight or maintenance, and as a result, was in an extremely dilapidated state. In fact, since 2015, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection had been advising customers to boil their water before consumption.

Although Aqua Pennsylvania specializes in larger water systems serving towns and municipalities, we were pleased to be able to jump into action to help a community that had nowhere else to turn. Within eight days of being granted official approval by the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission to take over the system, we were able to make enough short-term improvements to have the boil water advisory lifted. My team did a great job and I’m extremely proud of their efforts to make this really important improvement.

Sun Valley's existing storage tank.

The ongoing absence of rehabilitation and maintenance to the Sun Valley water system has made it necessary to rebuild the entire system to ensure reliable service and safe water going forward. Aqua Pennsylvania will construct a new well and water tank, replace all of the pipes and install water meters. The cost will likely exceed $2 million, which will be funded in part by state loans and grants.

The work Aqua Pennsylvania is doing in Sun Valley is an extreme example of what’s occurring with water infrastructure across the country, and it highlights the important role that publicly regulated companies can play in addressing our nation’s crumbling infrastructure. With over a century of experience in water and wastewater operations, Aqua has the ability to help troubled water and wastewater systems, and we will continue to lend our expertise to ensure communities across the country have access to safe and clean water and reliable service.

Sun Valley's existing well station chemical feed.

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Digging Deep into Groundwater Treatment

Welcome back to Aquastructure, our year-long blog series where we help you, loyal water user, become a real-life expert on all things H2O. We’re going behind the scenes of Aqua’s daily operations to break down all the complicated systems that work together to bring you clean, refreshing water each and every day.

Last month, we learned all about surface water and the treatment process that goes into making water from lakes, rivers and reservoirs clean and crisp. This month, we’ll tackle groundwater and learn a bit about how that water becomes something we actually can put into our bodies.

We turned to Alissa Vanim, manager of environmental compliance at Aqua New Jersey and Joe Mingle, director of operations at Aqua New Jersey, to get the 411 on groundwater treatment.

So what makes groundwater special?

Let’s start with the most obvious fact: groundwater comes from—drum roll, please—the ground. Deep within the earth, there are underground wells that collect buckets beyond buckets of water from aquifers, which are layers of rock and soil that transmit water. Those aquifers contain water from a mix of natural sources, such as precipitation (like rain or snow) and nearby rivers and streams.

But that well water isn’t as drinkable as we’d like—it’s been hanging out in the dark hundreds of feet below the ground, after all.  

Okay, but how does the groundwater leave the ground?

After a while, those wells fill up, and it’s time for all that groundwater to see the light of day. So off it goes to a treatment plant, where the water undergoes various treatment processes depending on its quality. This may include a bit of the ion-exchange process. The ion-exchange process sounds super complicated, but it’s really just a mix of positively and negatively charged ions doing some black magic to remove contaminants such as nitrate, fluoride, sulfate and arsenic.

Is that all?

Of course not—that’d be too easy. There are also activated-carbon contactors that absorb other chemicals that don’t belong in our drinking water. This improves the taste of the water and removes odors as well.

Sometimes nuisance metals, like iron or manganese, seep into the water, so that’s where sequestration comes in. This process makes sure the water isn’t discolored or metallic.

Lastly, there’s aeration, which raises the pH levels and removes CO2 gases from the groundwater. All in all, this pre-treatment process is just a necessary step we have to take to remove a ton of harmful pollutants from our water. 

Is the next stop chlorination?

Back in the day, waterborne diseases wreaked havoc on society. But thanks to chlorination, all those harmful bacteria and viruses (think: salmonella, E-Coli, Coliform, Legionella and fecal coliform) get destroyed so we can go on living happy, healthy, hydrated lives.

Once all that water has been chlorinated, it moves on to post-treatment. Here, green sand filters pull out any additional iron manganese and hydrogen sulfide to achieve optimal water quality. Finally, post-treatment chlorination is added as the last process before delivery.

Can I get the water now?

Now that the water is clean, it’s time to send it off to you, the water customers of the world. If the water is not immediately needed, it is transported into large, elevated storage tanks. From there, all that safe, drinkable water gets distributed to you via underground pipes so that you can drink it, cook with it, wash with it or flush it away to your heart’s desire.

Ta-da! That’s all for groundwater treatment, folks. Join us next month, where we’ll provide all of the (dirty) details on wastewater. 

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