Winter is Freezing—But Your Pipes Don’t Have to Be

As we all know, winter is here, and that means it’s cold outside. While you can keep yourself warm by throwing on another jacket or blanket, it’s important to remember that your pipes don’t have the same option. The water inside them can freeze and expand, causing major problems throughout the winter season.

Want to avoid that nightmare? We want to help you do so. We’ve recruited the help of our old friends Fred Wags and Felicia Fluff to help teach you the steps you can take to prevent frozen pipes.  

Step One: Thaw

If your pipes are starting to freeze, follow Fred’s lead and grab a hair dryer. Hold it about six inches away from the frozen area of the pipe, and move it back and forth to thaw out the pipes and get your water flowing again.

Step Two: Insulate 

Fred and Felicia are keeping warm, but that’s because they have fur. Pipes don’t have jackets or fur, so insulation is the next best thing! If you’re unsure about how to insulate your pipes, check out this video by the U.S. Department of Energy. Make sure you follow the step-by-step instructions to insulate the pipes in the cold areas of your house so you don’t have to worry about breaking out the hair dryer again.

Step Three: Open Doors

While we aren’t telling you to keep any major entry or exit points open, there are a few doors in your house that should stay ajar this winter season. Any cabinet doors underneath a sink should be left open to allow hot air to flow in and warm up the pipes. Just make sure Fred and Felicia don’t get their paws on anything they shouldn’t!

Step Four: Remove Hoses

Before it gets too cold, make sure to go outside and pack your hoses away for the winter. It sounds simple, but this quick action will keep hoses from getting exposed to the elements, freezing or getting damaged over the winter months.

Step Five: Keep Water Running

Felicia and Fred are thirsty little creatures, and if you want to keep them hydrated, listen up. Make sure to keep the water source furthest away from your heater running with a small stream if the temperature outside gets below 10 degrees. Moving water doesn’t freeze, so this trick will ensure that your pipes don’t, either.

Step Six: Eliminate Drafts 

If you want to keep Fred, Felicia and your pipes warm, it’s important to eliminate any drafts you have coming into your house. Your pets will be happier, and you will be too. If you’re not quite sure how to fix drafts, this guide from This Old House should send you in the right direction.

Thanks for taking the time to learn about ways to prevent your pipes from freezing this winter season. Fred and Felicia are feeling confident the pipes won't freeze this winter, and you should too.

Stay warm, and stay safe!

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What Are Toilets Called Around The World?

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Join us in saluting the veterans of Aqua

At Aqua, we feel very grateful that we employ so many veterans who bring their dedication, courage and spirit to our company. As Veterans Day approaches, we want to take some time to recognize and give a special thank you to some of the veterans who work within our Aqua family.

First recognized as Armistice Day in 1919 and eventually broadened to Veterans Day in 1954, the holiday serves as an opportunity to thank, celebrate and remember the individuals who have served and continue to serve in our nation’s armed forces. 

“It’s an honor to work alongside the veterans throughout Aqua’s workforce,” said Aqua CEO Chris Franklin. “I want to take this opportunity to personally thank each of the men and women at Aqua who have served, and to wish you a happy Veterans Day.”

We are thankful that these men and women are a part of our team. At Aqua, we will always strive to create opportunities for our veterans and continue to embrace and honor the incredible work they’ve done for our nation.  

“We have long recognized that hiring veterans and members of our military community brings exceptional strengths to the business, which is why we actively engage and recruit talent with military backgrounds,” said Satnaree Brandon, manager of talent acquisition. “Aqua’s core values of integrity, respect and (the pursuit of) excellence align with the training veterans receive while in the service, providing them with a strong foundation in leadership and an exceptional value system that supports and builds on these values when they join our team.”

“Aqua is making a tremendous effort to foster inclusion within our workforce to better reflect the diverse communities we serve,” added Franklin. “Aqua is partnering with veterans coalitions to engage, hire and support transitioning veterans to civilian life. The work ethic and camaraderie these service members bring to their teams is an invaluable asset to their fellow employees and our customers.”

We hope you enjoy meeting some of our Aqua employees who have bravely served our country and shared their stories with us. Thank you to all of our veterans, both within our Aqua family and in the communities we serve, for your hard work and bravery. We wish you and your families a very happy Veterans Day.

 

John Aulbach (center), President, Virginia (Virginia)

Military branch: United States Army - Infantry

Rank: Colonel

Years served: 1981–2011

Most interesting deployment/assignment:

My most interesting and demanding assignment and deployment was in 2005 to Iraq commanding a brigade military transition team embedded with an Iraqi light infantry brigade. While interesting, it was also challenging to execute a complex mission across language and cultural barriers.

What does it mean to you to be a veteran?

As a veteran I am proud to have served and am grateful for the opportunities provided to me to develop within my chosen careers. Additionally, I have deep respect for veterans’ families who bear extreme hardships and am grateful for my wife and children who have been supportive of my profession.

How has being a veteran affected you professionally?

The ability to work in and lead large organizations built confidence in my own professional skill sets, as well as the ability to draw the maximum effort from each member of a team to accomplish a mission or assignment. My military experiences directly influenced my civilian career and the ability to be successful. 

 

Rickie Daniels, Facility Operator II (North Carolina)

Military branch: United States Marine Corps

Rank: Lance Corporal

Years served: Four years active duty

Most interesting deployment/assignment?

Most interesting deployment was with a Joint NATO exercise that took place in Norway in the winter. We had to take winter training for months beforehand. The Norwegian people I had the pleasure of meeting were fantastic hosts and very polite to the American troops.

What does it mean to you to be a veteran?

I’m proud to have had the opportunity to serve in the Marine Corps and help safeguard the freedoms we have in the USA.

How has being a veteran affected you professionally?

Being in the military taught me respect and responsibility, which I put to use in my personal and professional life to this day because they serve me well. 

 

Stephen Dunnahoe, Corporate Development Coordinator (Texas)

Military branch: United States Coast Guard

Rank: Logistics E-4

Years served: Six years total (four years active, two years reserve), 1978–1984

Most interesting deployment/assignment?

A year at Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak Alaska and being able to visit the Aleutians.

How has being a veteran affected you professionally?

It has taught me fidelity, integrity, zeal, honor and obedience.  

 

Kirklyn Fields, Facility Operator II (North Carolina)

Military branch: United States Marine Corps

Rank: Sergeant

Years served: 13 Years with an Honorable Discharge

Most interesting deployment/assignment?

I am a Veteran of the Gulf War (Desert Shield and Desert Storm).

 

Charles Meloche, Operator 1 (Indiana)

Military branch: United States Army Military Police

Rank: E-4 (Specialist 4)

Years served: Three years active duty and three years) reserve duty

Most interesting deployment/assignment?

I was stationed at Fort Gordon, Georgia for all three of my active duty years. My most interesting duty was military prisoner escort to places such as Fort Leavenworth KS (the big house) andFort Riley KS (Retraining Prison).

What does it mean to you to be a veteran?

I come from a military family and I am very proud of my family’s military history and am proud to have done my part in serving this great nation. Veterans Day is special to me, but I also try to honor veterans all year round. 

Brent C. Reeh, CTX Area Manager (Texas)

Military branch: United States Air Force Reserves

Rank: Master Sergeant (E-7)

Years served: 21

Most interesting deployment/assignment?

Most interesting deployment was to NATO Air Base Aviano AFB, located in northeastern Italy.  

What does it mean to you to be a veteran?

Although I spent more than 20 years in the armed service, I have a difficult time considering myself  a veteran - maybe it’s because I consider myself too young to be a veteran? The real veterans are those who didn’t return from the war. It’s about duty, honor, love of country, sacrifice and respect. I proudly served my country for what I was trained to do. 

Aaron Riedmann, Water Treatment Technician (Ohio)

Military branch: Navy

Rank: E-4

Years served: Four years

Most interesting deployment/assignment?

My most memorable deployment was to South America for humanitarian assistance. We went to Guatemala to help supply those in need of medical attention. We also built a new school and provided other resources for the locals.

What does it mean to you to be a veteran?

It means everything for me to be a veteran. I still to this day believe joining the military was the best decision I ever made.   

How has being a veteran affected you professionally?

Being a veteran has made me a better employee/worker. Veterans are always on time, ready to put in the needed work, and able and willing to learn. 

Michael A. Stephens, Area Supervisor III (New Jersey)

Military branch: United States Air Force

Rank: Staff Sergeant E-5

Years served: Seven years

Most interesting deployment/assignment?

Osan Air Base, Osan Korea. I was an Environmental Support Specialist (water and wastewater treatment and operations)and I volunteered to perform as 57th CES Dorm Manager Osan Korea, Honor Guard Tyndall AFB Panama City, Fla. and 348th CES Career Counselor McGuire AFB, New Jersey.

What does it mean to you to be a veteran?

I was quite honored to serve my country. The only way I knew to demonstrate how honored I was to be in the U.S. Air Force was to volunteer for additional duties.

Lawrence Weaver, Assistant Superintendent, Construction (Pennsylvania)

Military branch: United States Marine Corps

Rank: Sergeant

Years served: Six years

What does it mean to you to be a veteran?

The question of what being a veteran means to me brought a flurry of emotions. Pride, to be able to stand up and defend this great country, which I grew up loving as part of  a family full of veterans. Sadness, as it makes me reflect upon the comrades who paid the ultimate sacrifice defending this great country. Uncertainty, in thinking did I do enough when I was there? I feel humbled to have had the opportunity to serve next to so many Marines who volunteered on their own accord to protect this great nation. Being a veteran, I’m honored to have had the opportunity to help protect those freedoms like so many others did before me.

How has being a veteran affected you professionally? 

Being in the Marines affected me in more ways than I could have ever imagined. I learned that you have the power to overcome adversity no matter how big or how small the obstacle. Everyone plays a role in success no matter the scope of their job. Perseverance is possible in any situation. The unofficial motto of the Marine Corps, Improvise, Adapt, Overcome, has served its “family” well and has given its “brothers and sisters” the tools to succeed. Stay calm under pressure and you will be able to handle whatever comes your way, and be clear of mind to understand what is going on and how to correct it. Learn from one another as everyone is an expert in something. Respect is earned, not demanded.

Jacob Tune, Facility Operator I (Texas)

Military branch: United States Army

Rank: E-1

Years served: Two and a half years

Most interesting deployment/assignment?

I did a 12-month tour at 348th Quartermaster Co., Camp Humphreys, South Korea, 1994–1995.

How has being a veteran affected you professionally?

I acquired the ability to adapt and overcome any obstacle.

Roger Tupps, Regional Supervisor (North Carolina)

Military branch: United States Air Force

Rank: Master Sergeant

Years served: 20 years

What does it mean to you to be a veteran?

I’m proud to have served my country.

How has being a veteran affected you professionally?

I believe the military really helps with being able to deal with different situations that arise. It also teaches healthy work ethic.

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Decrease the grease with these easy tips

The holidays are quickly approaching, and in between traveling, cooking and decorating, you won’t want to worry about a clogged sink. That’s why Aqua is here to help you keep any and all grease monsters out of your home.

Follow these easy tips to prevent fat, oil and grease from blocking your drains and pipes.

Be informed

First, it’s important to know what types of food can cause clogged sinks. Here are some of the most common culprits:

● Butter

● Cooking oil

● Lard (shortening)

● Meats

● Greasy sauces

 

Consider the consequences

A clogged sink may not seem like a big inconvenience, because all it does is flood your sink—right? Wrong. Blocked pipes can cause serious damage to your home, community and wallet.

● Clogged pipes can become a health hazard by spreading bacteria that leads to various illnesses and unsanitary water.

● Clogged pipes can also cause an overflow of sewage, which is both gross and expensive. Sewage overflow can affect streets, yards and parks, and it can also lead to higher costs for local wastewater utilities.         

● Aside from all of that damage, clogged pipes can also pollute nearby groundwater, which harms both homes and the environment.

 

Practice smart cleaning habits

You don’t have to cut foods containing fat, oil and grease out of your diet to avoid issues, simply make these small adjustments to your cleaning habits in order to keep your sinks grease-free.

● Pour grease into a metal can rather than down the sink. It will change from liquid to semi-solid in form, and at that point, just toss the can into your trash bin.

● Keep strainers in your sink drains to catch small pieces of food and globs of grease. When you finish cooking and cleaning, empty the strainer into your trash bin.

● Don’t rely on a garbage disposal to keep your drain clog-free—they can’t keep grease out of your plumbing system.

● Throw away baby wipes, “flushable” wipes and other sanitary items that can get stuck in your pipes.

 

Invest in extra help for your business

Businesses often see higher traffic than private homes, which can mean more grease and bigger consequences. If you’re a business owner, consider installing vented grease traps that are designed to handle appropriate amounts of grease. Grease traps should be cleaned, maintained and serviced on a regular basis to ensure they work properly.

Don’t let fear of a clogged drain ruin your holiday fun. With these tips, you’ll be sure to kick out the grease monsters long before they can even make an appearance.

Keep checking back here for holiday water-smart tips from Aqua!

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Building a culture of inclusion at Aqua

By Aqua Talent Acquisition and Diversity Lead Satnaree Brandon

“Excuse me, miss, do you work at Aqua?” said a voice breaking me from the trance of my iPhone while commuting on the regional rail one morning.

“Yes, I do. Can I help you?” I asked, unsure if I was about to speak to a customer.

“You spoke to my son at a job fair two months ago. I can’t express how much it meant to me that you spent time with him asking him questions about his resume, coaching and engaging him in conversation,” she said

I braced myself for a long conversation with a doting mother, then I quickly remembered speaking with the woman and her son, who happened to be visually impaired, two months before. I handed them both my business card, which includes braille text, and encouraged her son to follow up with me if he was interested in applying for a job.

As the diversity lead at Aqua America, part of my job is to help pave our way as an employer of choice that values diversity and inclusion in the utility industry, which is not necessarily known for this. Speaking to a person who is visually impaired at a job fair might not seem significant, but I had conveyed to this young man and his mother that Aqua is a welcoming place to work, we are inclusive, and we place great value on you as an individual.

In traditional terms, growing a diverse workforce means that Aqua seeks to hire and promote a variety of people, regardless of ethnicity, nationality, gender or gender identification, sexual orientation, age, background or ability. But beyond building a diverse company, Aqua is looking to be an inclusive company, with a supportive and respectful environment where all employees can achieve their full potential.

Regardless of color or creed, it is human nature to seek out an inclusive workplace. Fair treatment, equal access to opportunity and feeling welcomed as a teammate who belongs there help to build a happy and engaged group of employees. When we talk about inclusion, we are talking about how we make the mix of differences come together and have meaning, with the ultimate goal to provide everyone a seat at the table.

Aqua understands that building a culture of inclusion requires representation of diversity at all levels of the organization, and Aqua’s approach has been to build this from the top down. While 20 percent of our leadership at the vice president level and above is female, which is uncommon for our industry, we are also working to ensure a similar collection of diverse outlooks throughout the rest of the company.

But our goals extend beyond making sure we hire women, veterans, minorities, or any other specific group. It’s about transforming Aqua’s recruitment and retention strategy to ensure that we recruit, train, retain and promote engaged, passionate employees who will flourish.  In taking initial steps to realize this vision, Aqua is exploring partnerships with diversity organizations to build a talent pipeline specific to diversity. We’re also actively participating in career forums, attending young professional networking events, partnering with veterans coalitions to engage, hire and support transitioning veterans to civilian life, and encouraging mentor relationships with the senior leadership team.

   

While I’m at the beginning of my tenure with Aqua – only nine months in this role – I am encouraged by senior leadership’s belief that diversity and inclusion is an essential aspect of our company’s culture as we continue to grow. I always say that if you build an inclusive culture they will come, and I look forward to updating you in the coming months on the progress we’re making to transform our company. 

 

 

 

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