Winter Activities for Every Type of Weather

 

To sled or not to sled… that is the question. When you think of winter activities, the first things that come to mind are probably building snowmen, making snow angels, and having friendly snowball fights. 

But what if it doesn’t snow? There are plenty of areas across our Aqua states that experience different types of winter weather, but they can have just as much fun! Whether or not it snows in your region, we’re here to think outside the box with creative winter activities to keep things fresh and fun for the whole family.

 

 

No Snow? No Problem

If you live in a place that never experiences snow or the winter season just isn’t delivering those picture-perfect snowy scenes, you can still make your own! All you need to make fake snow is two ingredients: baking soda and water. 

Here's how to do it:

1. Pour 4 cups of frozen baking soda into a large bowl or container.

2. Slowly begin to add cold water to the baking soda and mix

3. Keep adding cold water until you reach your desired consistency

 

Snow Art

Spice up your snow day activities by adding snow paint into the mix! This easy, DIY recipe allows kids of all ages to use the whole yard as a canvas. 

What you'll need:

  • 2 tbsp. cornstarch
  • 2 cups water
  • Empty spray bottle
  • Liquid food coloring
  • Bowl and spoon
  • Funnel (optional) 

Whether you want to build a mini snowman or add some winter flair to your holiday decorations, this simple process is easy for kids to follow along and be a part of the magic. The frozen baking soda makes the fake snow cold to the touch, making it even more realistic. 

 

Get mixing:

  • Mix cornstarch with water until you reach a milky consistency
  • Add food coloring and stir until mixure is your desired color
  • Carefully pour the mixture into a spray bottle (this is where the optional funnel comes in)
  • Repeat the simple process with various colors

Now you’re ready to paint! Experiment with different spray settings and colors for a fun-filled snowy afternoon. 

Speaking of snow, don’t forget to check out our guide to making your own snow globes for holiday decorations or gifts. 

Have a safe and happy holiday season! 

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How Hollywood Movies Make Fake Rain and Snow

 

Sometimes the weather in a movie can help set the scene, and other times it’s the entire focal point. A scorching trek through the hot desert, a kiss in the rain, a holiday miracle under the falling snow...the list goes on! 

Have you ever wondered how Hollywood producers create these weather effects for a scene when it’s not actually raining or snowing? Let’s find out. 

Singing in the Rain

 

 

 

Whether it's an extreme downpour or a light drizzle, rain can set the mood for a great movie scene. Sometimes, set designers connect massive hoses to fire hydrants or trucks during outdoor shoots, then spray the hoses as desired from substantial heights.

Indoors, though, Most filmmakers use one or multiple rain curtains or rain bars, devices that create a rainfall effect when paired with some clever camera angles, lighting, and fans. 

Let It Snow

 

 

 

Hollywood waits for no one, which means that many holiday movies or snowy sets are actually filmed during other seasons or in places that rarely get snow. So, how do filmmakers make fake snow to create the perfect winter wonderland?

In the very early days of movie magic, substances such as white-painted cornflakes, salt, and flour were used to create the illusion of snow. Nowadays, CGI accounts for some of the amazing effects, but science has also come a long way in creating the perfect snowy substance that’s both safe and believable. 

Thin paper and plastics are two substances that are often shredded to look like snowflakes and blown around with huge wind machines to create a faux snowy scene. It may not sound picturesque, but it sure looks good! 

DIY Movie Set 

 

If you’re looking to create your own movie magic, there are simple recipes for artificial snow that don’t break the bank. All you need is laundry soap flakes or instant potato flakes and a strong fan to create a decent illusion of blowing snow. If you’re looking to set the stage with snow on the ground, you can mix liquid starch, laundry soap flakes, and blue food coloring. 

Creating your own rain may take a bit more effort. But all you need is a garden hose and a bit of determination! 

Next time you’re watching your favorite film, keep an eye out for the special weather effects filmmakers use to create the illusion of rain or snow. It may not be real water, but it’s still magical!

 

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The Science of Seltzer Water

 

Soda water may sound like something that was invented in the ‘80s, but we’ve actually been drinking it since the 1600s! People have used different methods to create it over the years, ranging from fermentation to taking carbon dioxide straight from the mines. But do you ever wonder how exactly those bubbles got into your water?

 

Soda bubbles form out of a gas called carbon dioxide that is omnipresent in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is the gas that creates all the fizziness. The more carbon dioxide you add to water, the more bubbles and tangy taste you get, which is perfect for anyone who loves a twist in their water!

 

 

 

Carbon dioxide doesn’t exactly have a taste on its own, which is why when added to any drink, it creates a sharp, acidic sensation in your mouth. In fact, it forms something called carbonic acid, which in turn creates that crisp, tangy flavor.

  

The most common way of making your own seltzer is through a seltzer machine, which can be found online or at most department or home goods stores. The only other ingredient you need is the water straight out of your tap! A seltzer machine adds pressure to the water through its wand and creates bubbles as the pressure is released. The tube or wand uses pressure to dissolve and trap the carbon dioxide in your water. This chemical reaction is also used to make beer and soda foamy!

 

 

 

Another way to create bubbles is by dropping the temperature of the water and adding carbon dioxide to it, but you should leave that method to the pros. If you’ve ever wondered why your drinks stay crispier when they’re cold, now you have your answer!

 

What sounds better than a glass of cold, crisp seltzer to beat the heat while teaching the kids the science of it all? Cheers to a delicious and educational summer!

 

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