Winter Activities for Every Type of Weather

 

To sled or not to sled… that is the question. When you think of winter activities, the first things that come to mind are probably building snowmen, making snow angels, and having friendly snowball fights. 

But what if it doesn’t snow? There are plenty of areas across our Aqua states that experience different types of winter weather, but they can have just as much fun! Whether or not it snows in your region, we’re here to think outside the box with creative winter activities to keep things fresh and fun for the whole family.

 

 

No Snow? No Problem

If you live in a place that never experiences snow or the winter season just isn’t delivering those picture-perfect snowy scenes, you can still make your own! All you need to make fake snow is two ingredients: baking soda and water. 

Here's how to do it:

1. Pour 4 cups of frozen baking soda into a large bowl or container.

2. Slowly begin to add cold water to the baking soda and mix

3. Keep adding cold water until you reach your desired consistency

 

Snow Art

Spice up your snow day activities by adding snow paint into the mix! This easy, DIY recipe allows kids of all ages to use the whole yard as a canvas. 

What you'll need:

  • 2 tbsp. cornstarch
  • 2 cups water
  • Empty spray bottle
  • Liquid food coloring
  • Bowl and spoon
  • Funnel (optional) 

Whether you want to build a mini snowman or add some winter flair to your holiday decorations, this simple process is easy for kids to follow along and be a part of the magic. The frozen baking soda makes the fake snow cold to the touch, making it even more realistic. 

 

Get mixing:

  • Mix cornstarch with water until you reach a milky consistency
  • Add food coloring and stir until mixure is your desired color
  • Carefully pour the mixture into a spray bottle (this is where the optional funnel comes in)
  • Repeat the simple process with various colors

Now you’re ready to paint! Experiment with different spray settings and colors for a fun-filled snowy afternoon. 

Speaking of snow, don’t forget to check out our guide to making your own snow globes for holiday decorations or gifts. 

Have a safe and happy holiday season! 

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Get in the Holiday Spirit with DIY Snow Globes

 

If you’re looking for a fun DIY project for kids and adults alike, you’ve come to the right place! Snow globes are a staple of any holiday fun, and creating your own makes for both a fun activity with the family and a great homemade gift. Plus, any snow globe includes our favorite material: water!

What you’ll need:

-A small glass mason jar
-A plastic figurine (or whatever you’d like to be the star of the scene)
-Glitter or sequins
-Water
-Spoon
-Super glue or a hot glue gun

What to do:

1. Get creative and choose what you want to be the centerpiece of your snow globe. Use something like a plastic figurine, a Lego, or a small ornament. It can be holiday-themed or even beach-themed to warm you up during the colder months!
2. Once you have your figurine, use super glue or a hot glue gun to attach the plastic object to the lid of the jar.
3.Fill the jar with cold water.
4.Add your desired amount of glitter and sequins.
5.Screw the lid back onto the jar.
6.Turn it upside down and make it “snow”! 

Bonus tip: Add a few drops of glycerin to make the glitter float even better.  

Ta-da! Now, you have your very own snow globe to enjoy throughout the season or give as a holiday gift. We’d love to see your creations—share with us on Facebook and Twitter

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Building with Water: An Icy Endeavor

Image via Wikimedia Commons

Say it with us: Ice is the new brick! It may seem physically impossible, but some of the world’s most breathtaking structures consist entirely of frozen water.

Whether permanent, semi-permanent or temporary, these renowned structures push the boundaries of traditional architecture and have us wanting to travel the world just to catch a glimpse of their beauty. 

 

Sorrisniva Igloo Hotel — Finnmark, Norway

Sorrisniva Igloo Hotel rests in the county of Finnmark, Norway and was first introduced to the world in 1999. It is the largest, northernmost ice hotel in Europe and the second ever constructed in the world.  

Like Sweden’s IceHotel, the Sorrisniva Igloo Hotel is reconstructed annually. The hotel consists of 30 rooms, a chapel and ice gallery, all of which adhere to a new theme each year. Sorrisniva is open for reservations from mid-December through the beginning of April every year.

 

IceHotel — Jukkasjärvi, Sweden

Sweden’s IceHotel—the first in the world—was founded in 1989 and has been rebuilt every year since its inception. With 55 rooms, 10 restaurants and an ice chapel, the IceHotel undoubtedly attracts a lot of attention. In fact, artists from all over the world apply for an opportunity to contribute to the hotel’s building and design every year.

The hotel, built naturally with ice and snow from the nearby Torne River, is open annually from December through April and ultimately melts in the summer—only to be rebuilt again the following year. Those who book a stay at the incredible IceHotel in the winter months have a chance to see the Aurora Borealis firsthand.

 

Hôtel de Glace — Quebec, Canada

The Hôtel de Glace (“Ice Hotel”), originally built in 2001, was the first ice hotel in North America. This 44-room hotel is furnished with deer furs for warmth and contains a chapel, spa and even a slide constructed of ice. It generally requires 50 workers and an estimated month and a half to construct the building, which consists of 30,000 tons of snow and 500 tons of ice. The hotel is available for booking from January until March, and rooms start at $450 per person.

Winter Carnival — St. Paul, Minnesota, United States

After a New York reporter referred to Saint Paul, Minnesota as “another Siberia, unfit for human habitation” in 1885, the city’s population decided to take a stand. They created what is now known as the Saint Paul Winter Carnival and have since constructed a total of 36 ice palaces as chief attractions to the annual carnival. Unfortunately, the city is unable to build an ice palace for every carnival and the latest structure was constructed in 2004—nearly 13 years ago!

Ice Palace — St. Petersburg, Russia

Image via pxhere

In 1740, the world’s first known ice palace was commissioned by Russia’s Empress Anna Ivanovna to celebrate Russia’s victory over the Ottoman Empire. The empress requested the construction of an enormous ice palace to commemorate the victory. In 2005, Russian historians teamed up with ice sculptor Valerij Gromov to recreate the ice palace.

From hotels to palaces to everything in between, buildings made from ice are impressive both as works of art and feats of engineering. For more winter wanderlust, check out our guide to water-tastic vacations

 

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