QUIZ: How Well Do You Know the Water Cycle?

How much do you remember about the water cycle? The process is vital to life on Earth, yet we often only think of the water cycle when weather gets in the way of our plans. The water cycle also plays a major part in long-term climate change and global economics.

To test your knowledge of the process, we put a little quiz together. And if you have little ones at home, you can take this quiz with them for added fun, especially since the water cycle is typically taught in elementary school.

 

For the title of Aqua Expert:

1. Water covers approximately how much of the Earth’s surface?

a. The whole thing

b. One half

c. Three quarters

d. Two thirds

2. Clouds form during which step of the water cycle?

a. Melting

b. Evaporation

c. Condensation

d. Fluffing

3. Why is ocean water so salty?

a. So that boats can float

b. Salt cannot evaporate with water

c. A chef seasoned it that way

d. There are large natural salt blocks along the ocean floor

4. What is the proper name for the process of water evaporating from plants?

a. Transpiration

b. Perspiration

c. A temperate tantrum

d. Sweating greens

5. Which of the following is NOT a form of precipitation?

a. Sleet

b. Drought

c. Rain

d. Snow

 

Answers

 

Image via NASA

 

1. (c) Three quarters. Water covers about 71 percent of Earth, or just under three quarters. It’s no wonder most evaporation occurs on ocean surfaces!

 

2. (c) Condensation. Clouds form when water vapor condenses back into a liquid. The water droplets gather in the sky until they become too heavy, then fall back to earth as precipitation.

 

3. (b) Salt cannot evaporate with water. Small amounts of salt are released into fresh water rivers that naturally flow out to oceans and seas. The salt is left behind when water evaporates or freezes. Therefore, the ocean is always getting saltier!

 

4. (a) Transpiration. Humans lose water through breathing, and so do plants. In fact, 10 percent of water in the atmosphere is believed to come from transpiration.

 

5. (b) Drought. Drought refers to a lack of precipitation. While drought doesn’t immediately threaten us like other natural disasters, it can be one of the most expensive weather-related events to affect an area.

 

How did you do? Which questions did you find simple or surprising? Let us know!

 

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Water Conservation: Back to School Edition

 

Going back to school can bring thoughts of autumn weather and homework. Water conservation in the classroom is not always a top priority, but we think it should be! 

You might be thinking that there isn’t very much you can do to conserve water at school and in the classroom, but we have some ideas for you.

1. Teach

One of the first steps in water conservation is creating awareness. If you’re a teacher, consider creating a lesson that revolves around water conservation. For younger students, try a fun activity such as an edible aquifer or a water bracelet.

If you’re a parent and your child is not learning about water conservation at school, try teaching a small lesson. Even reading a book or watching a short video can help your child to realize the importance of water conservation.

2. Check

The place where students and teachers have the most control over water conservation is the bathroom. Make sure that the faucet is completely turned off and the toilet is no longer running before leaving the bathroom. If something seems to be leaking or off, notify maintenance so that they can fix the problem.

3. Replace

A lot of schools already have energy-efficient equipment. If yours does not, make a suggestion to the school administration about replacing the old equipment. Dishwashers and other large appliances can use a great deal of water and energy.

4. Reuse

Reuse water as much as possible in the classroom. If there is ever any leftover water from water bottles, consider watering a classroom plant or cleaning something with the water. Making sure that all water is put to good use is key to conservation.

5. Rethink

Conserving water outside is important, too. If your school has a field or any kind of grass on the property, suggest setting the mower blades to 2-3 inches high. This way, the grass will be left long enough to shade the soil, which will allow for moisture retention and protect the grass from drought.

Water conservation is always important, don’t let it fall by the wayside this back to school season. With a little knowledge and creativity, water conservation can be easy and enjoyable for everyone!

 

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