How Hollywood Movies Make Fake Rain and Snow

 

Sometimes the weather in a movie can help set the scene, and other times it’s the entire focal point. A scorching trek through the hot desert, a kiss in the rain, a holiday miracle under the falling snow...the list goes on! 

Have you ever wondered how Hollywood producers create these weather effects for a scene when it’s not actually raining or snowing? Let’s find out. 

Singing in the Rain

 

 

 

Whether it's an extreme downpour or a light drizzle, rain can set the mood for a great movie scene. Sometimes, set designers connect massive hoses to fire hydrants or trucks during outdoor shoots, then spray the hoses as desired from substantial heights.

Indoors, though, Most filmmakers use one or multiple rain curtains or rain bars, devices that create a rainfall effect when paired with some clever camera angles, lighting, and fans. 

Let It Snow

 

 

 

Hollywood waits for no one, which means that many holiday movies or snowy sets are actually filmed during other seasons or in places that rarely get snow. So, how do filmmakers make fake snow to create the perfect winter wonderland?

In the very early days of movie magic, substances such as white-painted cornflakes, salt, and flour were used to create the illusion of snow. Nowadays, CGI accounts for some of the amazing effects, but science has also come a long way in creating the perfect snowy substance that’s both safe and believable. 

Thin paper and plastics are two substances that are often shredded to look like snowflakes and blown around with huge wind machines to create a faux snowy scene. It may not sound picturesque, but it sure looks good! 

DIY Movie Set 

 

If you’re looking to create your own movie magic, there are simple recipes for artificial snow that don’t break the bank. All you need is laundry soap flakes or instant potato flakes and a strong fan to create a decent illusion of blowing snow. If you’re looking to set the stage with snow on the ground, you can mix liquid starch, laundry soap flakes, and blue food coloring. 

Creating your own rain may take a bit more effort. But all you need is a garden hose and a bit of determination! 

Next time you’re watching your favorite film, keep an eye out for the special weather effects filmmakers use to create the illusion of rain or snow. It may not be real water, but it’s still magical!

 

Share This Post:

Snow Storms, Road Salt and Drinking Water Quality – What’s the Connection?

Most people don’t make a connection between salting their sidewalks, driveways and roads, and their drinking water, but there is a connection.

Believe it or not, road salts were not used in the U.S. until after 1942. Prior to then, abrasives (ash and cinders, sand) were typically used. After World War II, the expansion of the federal highway system helped facilitate the widespread use of road salts in highway safety. Today, 8 to 12 million tons of road salts are applied on highways every year. In 2016 alone, highway deicing consumed about 44 percent of the 42 million tons of total salt produced in the U.S.  


So, what does the salt placed on roads, highways and sidewalks have to do with drinking water? Well, it’s simple. When the snow melts, the road salt eventually runs off into storm drains and ends up in a local stream or river. As a result, sometimes water might taste a little salty immediately after the snow melts. It can also eventually make its way into the groundwater.

Over the past several decades, there has been an increasing trend in the levels of sodium and chloride in fresh water streams and rivers. Salt is very difficult to remove from water without using desalination equipment, which is not a practical technology for most water supplies that are not in desert areas. Salt in streams and other fresh water sources has a major impact on the fish and other aquatic life that cannot tolerate the salt levels. Salt actually sticks around in the streams and rivers and gradually makes them more salty over time.

So, what can we do? We need salt to keep our roads, highways and sidewalks safe. Balancing the need for safety with protecting drinking water supplies has been a challenge water suppliers, environmental organizations, and highway administrators, from the Great Lakes to New England, have been working to solve for some time now. Here are a couple of things you can do because every spoonful of salt counts. 

  • Use salt brine application prior to a snow event. Many highway organizations already do this, which saves money and makes roads safer.
  • Do not dump deicing salts onto storm drains to unblock a frozen drain. If you can’t clear them by hand, use hot water instead.
  • Don’t dump left over rock salt and deicing chemicals onto the ground or down storm drains. Talk to your local municipality about the best way to dispose these leftover chemicals.
  • Consider alternatives, such as beet juice, to salt pavements and driveways when possible. The sugars in beet juice have been used for deicing in areas around the Great Lakes. These are also typically pet-friendly as well, although, you should always check the label to confirm.
  • Try shoveling your sidewalk or driveway first, and let the sun to melt the sidewalk. Use salt on hard-to-melt areas.

The following articles by Steve Corsi from United States Geological Survey provide a more in-depth look at the science of road salt and its impact on streams, rivers and aquatic organisms:

Evaluating chloride trends due to road-salt use and its impacts on water quality and aquatic organisms

River chloride trends in snow-affected urban watersheds: increasing concentrations outpace urban growth rate and are common among all seasons

 

 

Share This Post:

Top 5 Spots for a Dreamy Water-cation

 

The nip seems to be back in the air, which can only mean one thing – winter is officially here. The cold months that are about to come can seem pretty daunting. Just thinking about shoveling snow is sending us shivers.

That being said, it’s no surprise that some warm vacation spots are on our minds. If we could, we would visit all of the amazing, water-filled places below. Take a look at our dream list and get ready to plan your own getaway.

1. Trevi Fountain (Rome, Italy)

If this isn’t at the top of your bucket list, you should move it there. Trevi Fountain is the epitome of amazing water features. Not only is it beautifully designed and incredible to look at, but it’s also located in one of the most romantic cities in the world.

This vacation spot is a must see!

2. Great Wolf Lodge (United States)

Don’t feel like flying all the way to Italy for your next vacation? Then you should definitely check out Great Wolf Lodge. With 13 different locations around the U.S., you’re guaranteed to find some fun.

So what makes this hotel special? At each location guests will find an entire waterpark, indoors. Yep, that’s right: water slides, a lazy river and more all exist inside the resort.

Image via Wikimedia Commons

3. Lover's Cove (Avalon, California)

Crystal clear water, tons of ocean wildlife and an amazing location – Lover’s Cove is certainly a snorkeling paradise. Located in Southern California, this marine sanctuary is protected by the state and pollution free.

Snorkel or scuba dive, go with your significant other or bring the family along. Whatever you choose to do, we can promise you’ll have an amazing time.

4. Hanakapi`ai Falls (Kauai, Hawaii)

This gorgeous waterfall is located in scenic and sunny Hawaii. With more popular destination spots like Honolulu, the island of Kauai is often overlooked. That’s what we think makes Hanakapi`ai Falls an incredible vacation.

5. Cayman Islands

Are you ready for the ultimate getaway? Saying the stunning Cayman Islands are picturesque is an understatement.

Warm waters, bright beaches and striking scenery are just a few of the many things this island holds in store for you.

Now that you’re inspired, it’s time to book your trip! Even if you don’t end up flying across the ocean, we hope that you have a wonderful, warm, vacation.

 

Share This Post: