How Hollywood Movies Make Fake Rain and Snow

 

Sometimes the weather in a movie can help set the scene, and other times it’s the entire focal point. A scorching trek through the hot desert, a kiss in the rain, a holiday miracle under the falling snow...the list goes on! 

Have you ever wondered how Hollywood producers create these weather effects for a scene when it’s not actually raining or snowing? Let’s find out. 

Singing in the Rain

 

 

 

Whether it's an extreme downpour or a light drizzle, rain can set the mood for a great movie scene. Sometimes, set designers connect massive hoses to fire hydrants or trucks during outdoor shoots, then spray the hoses as desired from substantial heights.

Indoors, though, Most filmmakers use one or multiple rain curtains or rain bars, devices that create a rainfall effect when paired with some clever camera angles, lighting, and fans. 

Let It Snow

 

 

 

Hollywood waits for no one, which means that many holiday movies or snowy sets are actually filmed during other seasons or in places that rarely get snow. So, how do filmmakers make fake snow to create the perfect winter wonderland?

In the very early days of movie magic, substances such as white-painted cornflakes, salt, and flour were used to create the illusion of snow. Nowadays, CGI accounts for some of the amazing effects, but science has also come a long way in creating the perfect snowy substance that’s both safe and believable. 

Thin paper and plastics are two substances that are often shredded to look like snowflakes and blown around with huge wind machines to create a faux snowy scene. It may not sound picturesque, but it sure looks good! 

DIY Movie Set 

 

If you’re looking to create your own movie magic, there are simple recipes for artificial snow that don’t break the bank. All you need is laundry soap flakes or instant potato flakes and a strong fan to create a decent illusion of blowing snow. If you’re looking to set the stage with snow on the ground, you can mix liquid starch, laundry soap flakes, and blue food coloring. 

Creating your own rain may take a bit more effort. But all you need is a garden hose and a bit of determination! 

Next time you’re watching your favorite film, keep an eye out for the special weather effects filmmakers use to create the illusion of rain or snow. It may not be real water, but it’s still magical!

 

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So your kid wants a pet fish. How much will that impact your water bill?

 

 

Compared to a cat or dog, allowing your child to adopt a fish may seem way less daunting—but is the worry of an increased water bill holding you back? Between filling and cleaning a water tank, adding a fishy friend to your household may sound like a burden. We’re here to bust some myths and break down how much you can actually expect your water bill to be impacted (spoiler alert: it’s not a lot). 

 

Finding the right fit 


The first step of any pet adoption process is finding the right fit. Read up on different species of fish to ensure you choose the best option for your child, as the level of care ranges for different types. It’s also very important to choose the right tank for your fish, which in turn will affect the amount of water you will use per month depending on size and filtering abilities. You can either choose a fish first and research into the perfect tank, or if you’re still weary on water usage, choose a smaller tank and find a fish to fit!

 

 

How often to clean

 

The monotonous process of cleaning and replacing water in an aquarium may put you off on the idea of becoming a fish parent, but the reality is far easier than you’d suspect. The average recommendation is to implement a 30% water change every 2–4 weeks. But, once again, this may vary depending on species and size of the tank. That’s why it’s important to do your research! 

 

Bonus: It’s suggested to try not to change more than 50% of the water, because doing so can remove helpful bacteria that has grown within the tank or bowl.  

 

Teaching responsibility 

 

The truth of the matter is that you won’t know the exact expense of adding a pet fish until it’s adopted, especially with all of the different possible variations of fish and tank size.

 

   

 

However, why not use this moment to teach some important lessons in responsibility to the kids? Pay attention to the small difference in your water bill after adopting a fish, which usually ranges from a few cents to a couple of dollars. Then, consider asking your child to use a portion of their allowance or lemonade stand earnings to cover those expenses. This will teach them accountability, and they may even feel like proud fish parents with real responsibilities. 

 

Bottom line: if the only thing stopping you from getting a pet fish is the threat of a severely increased water bill—no need to worry. Very rarely will a little fishy friend add that much to your expenses. Either way, you can use it as a valuable lesson for your kids. So go ahead, do your research, and bring home the newest member of your family!

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How to Bring the Summer Olympics to Your Backyard

 

Even though the 2020 Summer Olympics have been postponed to 2021, there are still plenty of ways to feel the Olympic spirit this summer. We picked five Olympic sports you and your family can recreate in your own pool. With these tips and tricks, there’s no reason water-based exercise and fun needs to wait!

 

Just keep Swimming!

 

 

Swimming may be the obvious choice here, but it’s also a classic sport that can be reenacted in lots of different ways. There are four different styles of Olympic swimming: freestyle, butterfly, breaststroke, and backstroke. Take your pick and see who in your family can swim the fastest in each category. Just because you think you’re the master at butterfly, doesn’t mean you’ll be undefeated at backstroke—there's only one way to find out!

 

Strokes of an artist

 

 

Annette Kellerman is credited for the birth of artistic swimming. When she toured the United States performing water acrobatics, the spectacle proved to be incredibly popular and was later added to the Olympics. We can’t say we’re surprised by the swift gain in popularity. After all, who wouldn’t love dancing around in a pool? To recreate this sport, all you have to do is play your favorite song, jump in the water, and bust out your best moves! Bonus points if you can choreograph a routine with your fellow swimmers. 

 

Row, row, row your float

 

 

 

 

 

Did you know rowing was initially used to transport resources in ancient Egypt, Rome, and Greece? It’s believed that it officially turned into a sport around the 1828 Oxford-Cambridge university boat race. This one takes some creativity, so get ready to gather all your best pool floats! All you need to do is hop on your floatie of choice, grab some DIY row paddles (like your hands), and paddle across the pool to win that gold medal.

 

Make a Splash!

 

 

 

Diving was included in the Olympics for the first time during the summer of 1904 in St. Louis. The sport originated from gymnasts doing tumbling routines into the water. If your pool is deep enough to safely use a diving board, step on up and show off your best dive. We’ll even bend the rules this time to let cannon balls count! Get the whole family together to rate each diving pose and see who reigns supreme.

 

Water macro? Water polo!

  

 

 

All you need for a game of water polo is a ball, two teams, and goal posts at opposite ends of your pool. Teams score points by getting the ball through their opponent’s goal post, but don’t forget the rules—your feet can’t touch the bottom of the pool, and unless you’re the goalie, you can only use one hand at a time on the ball. Nets are best for the goals if you can find them, but even placing two chairs outside the pool will work fine. Remember to take a break if you get tired from treading water! 

 

As always, remember to take all necessary pool safety precautions before getting started. After all, games are only fun so long as everyone stays safe.

 

Lather up the sunscreen and go for the gold!

 

 

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What’s the Deal with Humidity, Anyway?

 

 

Have you ever gone outside and felt the air weighing on you? Or maybe you’ve noticed that it feels much hotter than it was yesterday, even though it’s the exact same temperature. How about when you get out of a steaming hot shower and dry off with a towel, only for your skin to still feel damp? 

 

Often, these strange sensations are the results of humidity. You may not be able to see it, but it is happening right in front of us in all climates!

 

What is humidity?

 

Humidity is simply the concentration of water vapor in the air. It’s not always as obvious as rain, and it’s usually invisible. Think of it as the difference between a hot, dry desert, and a tropical rainforest. 

 

There are different types of humidity and ways to measure how humid the air is. The most common forms are relative humidity and dew point. Relative humidityis theamount of moisture in the air relative to the temperature. This is what you hear about when you watch weather forecasts. It tells us the likeliness of precipitation, dew, or fog.

 

A measurement that you may be more familiar with is dew point. This is the temperature the air must be for water to condense and evaporate at the same rate. The higher the dew point, the more humid it is outside. This way is much easier for those of us who are not weather professionals to predict how we will feel when we step outside.

 

 

How does it work?

 

 

We know that through the water cycle, water evaporates and turns into water vapor. As the temperature rises, more water evaporates. At the point of saturation, the amount of water vapor is the highest it can be in the air. Because of all this water vapor, the air feels incredibly thick, stuffy, and humid.

 

 

How does humidity affect us?

 

The higher the relative humidity and dew point outside, the hotter it feels for us humans, because our sweat evaporates slower due to the already omnipresent moisture in the air. This kind of heat can also leave us dehydrated as it messes with our cooling mechanisms, so make sure you hydrate well and keep your body cool on humid days!

 

Humidity can have several effects indoors as well. Make sure you keep an eye on the humidity levels in your house as high levels can damage electronics and cause mold due to trapped water. Hot and humid climates are also more likely to be prone to hurricanes and flooding.


While humidity does sometimes have negative effects, it is still a necessary part of the water cycle. Without it, we wouldn’t have clouds, rain, or rainbows. And who wants that? Now that you know the science of it all, enjoy the outdoors this summer—but stay healthy and hydrated!

 

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The Science of Seltzer Water

 

Soda water may sound like something that was invented in the ‘80s, but we’ve actually been drinking it since the 1600s! People have used different methods to create it over the years, ranging from fermentation to taking carbon dioxide straight from the mines. But do you ever wonder how exactly those bubbles got into your water?

 

Soda bubbles form out of a gas called carbon dioxide that is omnipresent in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is the gas that creates all the fizziness. The more carbon dioxide you add to water, the more bubbles and tangy taste you get, which is perfect for anyone who loves a twist in their water!

 

 

 

Carbon dioxide doesn’t exactly have a taste on its own, which is why when added to any drink, it creates a sharp, acidic sensation in your mouth. In fact, it forms something called carbonic acid, which in turn creates that crisp, tangy flavor.

  

The most common way of making your own seltzer is through a seltzer machine, which can be found online or at most department or home goods stores. The only other ingredient you need is the water straight out of your tap! A seltzer machine adds pressure to the water through its wand and creates bubbles as the pressure is released. The tube or wand uses pressure to dissolve and trap the carbon dioxide in your water. This chemical reaction is also used to make beer and soda foamy!

 

 

 

Another way to create bubbles is by dropping the temperature of the water and adding carbon dioxide to it, but you should leave that method to the pros. If you’ve ever wondered why your drinks stay crispier when they’re cold, now you have your answer!

 

What sounds better than a glass of cold, crisp seltzer to beat the heat while teaching the kids the science of it all? Cheers to a delicious and educational summer!

 

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