Removing Iron and Revamping Water Systems in New Jersey

 

 

 

If you live in or near Berkeley and Bayville, New Jersey, this one’s for you: Aqua New Jersey recently completed capital improvement projects on three all-new water treatment facilities to add iron removal processes that ensure safe and reliable water for the community.

To learn more about the nitty-gritty details of these infrastructure upgrades—and why they’re so important—we spoke with Aqua New Jersey Project Manager Michael Convery

What exactly did the project involve?

In a nutshell, the central purpose of the project was the addition of iron removal treatment processes at our existing Lifetime Well 4 and Pinewald Wells 3 & 5 sites. It also involved the creation of a brand-new well at the Sherman Well 6 site, also with—you guessed it—iron removal treatment. 

 

The projects at all three sites involved the construction of new treatment buildings and the replacement of all existing well pumps, variable frequency drives (VFDs), chemical pumps, and other treatment-related equipment. Plus, all three sites introduced backwash tanks, allowing the ability to recycle 85% of backwash water, and upgraded existing Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems. 

Were all the project sites the same? 

Not quite—each site required its own unique dose of TLC. It was out with the old and in with the new at the Lifetime site, where crews retrofitted the old well treatment building with new equipment and constructed an additional treatment building for the iron removal filters with concrete masonry units (CMUs) and brick materials. 

Over at the Sherman site, crews drilled a new well and built a treatment building complete with all-new pumping and treatment equipment. This structure was constructed with CMUs and vinyl siding materials to blend in with the surrounding environment.

Finally, crews at the Pinewald site constructed a new iron removal treatment building made with CMUs and brick material for wells 3 & 5 following the demolition of the old treatment building. As an added bonus, all three sites now have GreensandPlus pressure filters for iron removal. (Trust us—in water provider language, that’s a huge plus!) 

What’s the big deal about removing iron from water?

At these plants, it’s essential to ensure the filters operate properly and backwash on the right parameters to achieve proper iron removal (and thus to achieve proper water quality). Luckily, there are controls in place at each location to make sure everything operates smoothly. 

According to Convery, the iron removal process involves using pressure filtration with manganese dioxide coated sand, which is known as GreensandPlus. “The system includes filter face piping with automatic valves and controls,” he adds. “The process involves air scouring capabilities to allow for efficient cleaning of filter media during backwashing.”

What happens next? 

Now that the intensive project is complete and Aqua New Jersey customers are benefiting from the upgraded facilities, Convery can look back fondly on the whole process. 

“The local operations group—especially Ron Suto, Mike Ricciardella, and Forrest Wolf—worked hard to keepthe system fully functional throughout the entire project,” he says. “It was a true team effort. Without all ofthe hard work of the New Jersey team and local operations, this project would not have been possible.”

Teams like these New Jersey employees are perfect examples of our commitment to the pursuit of excellence here at Aqua. Stay on the lookout for our next Aquastructure blog, where we’ll chronicle another chapter in our ongoing infrastructure improvement story!

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5 Ways to Conserve Water on Thanksgiving

The holidays are here! First up, Thanksgiving.

We’ve been on a mission to make to make this year’s festivities the best yet. That’s why we compiled our most helpful tips on how to conserve water before, during and after your meal.

Rinse and repeat

Cooking a large portion of vegetables or potatoes? Instead of running them under the sink, try filling a large bowl with water and using it to rinse your food. The best part? When you’re done with the dirty water you can use it to water your plants! (The same trick can also be used for washing your dishes after the meal.)

Defrost like a boss

We don’t have to remind you to defrost your turkey before the big day. The USDA says that you’ll need 1-3 days for about 4-12 lbs. of turkey.

Whatever you do, avoid using the cold water method. If you’re really in a time crunch, follow the USDA’s instructions for using the microwave.

Full steam ahead

If you’ve got all your burners on full blast and still need to steam something, place a strainer over one of your pots. This way you can save time, space and water! Done boiling? You can use the leftover water for a soup base.

Watering can, or can’t?

Waiting for the faucet to change temperature? Place a watering can over the drain to catch any of the excess water. This way, you can water your plants or refill the dog’s water bowl without wasting a drop!

Wasting away

The global average water footprint of chicken meat is 4330 liter/kg. Imagine what a larger bird like a turkey consumes. Don’t let all of the water that went into producing your turkey go to waste.

If you don’t have any room in your fridge (or stomach) for leftovers, send your guests home with doggy bags. You can also swing by your local soup kitchen or food shelter and donate what you have left – especially if you have any unopened boxes or cans you didn’t use.

Whether you’re cooking for a small group or the entire extended family, these conservation tips are sure to keep your household happy for the holidays.

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