Sunny Outlook

It’s another sunny workday in southeastern Pennsylvania. Dave Marozzi logs on to the web-based monitoring system that tracks the performance of the new 1-megawatt photovoltaic power system at Aqua’s Ingram’s Mill Water Treatment Plant. Not a cloud is in the sky as Marozzi, superintendent of the Pickering and Ingram’s Mill plants, observes the graph that tracks the output of the solar field. As expected, the solar field started producing energy soon after sunrise. 

When performance peaks sometime between 1:30 and 2 p.m., the 3.8-acre solar field will be really humming, generating enough electricity to power the plant essentially for free.

“At peak performance, Ingram’s Mill consumes, on average, about 700 kilowatts of electricity,” Marozzi explains. “So for four to five hours a day, we are basically getting free power and selling the excess back to PECO Energy.”

The Ingram’s Mill solar field went into service in December 2009. “Since it came up to full power, it has been exceeding our expectations,” says Karl Kyriss, executive vice  president of Aqua America.

“The solar energy supplements our power demand at Ingram’s Mill, providing approximately 30 percent of the power required to operate the plant. That offsets $115,000 of expense at the anticipated yearly cost of electricity.”

Overall, the project made good economic sense. “The price of solar panels has come down, and the availability of grants and tax incentives made it a viable economic alternative to help us supplement our energy demand and to help us manage rising energy costs as we go forward,” Kyriss says.

In addition, the investment in solar energy pays annual “dividends” in the form of solar renewable energy credits (SRECs).

In 2011, utilities’ energy portfolios must contain at least 3.5 percent renewable energy. Those that do not meet their individual solar goals must make payments into a renewable energy fund at a rate of 200 percent of the market value of the SRECs.

On the plus side, owners of a facility such as the solar field at Ingram’s Mill receive one SREC for each 1,000 kilowatt-hours of electricity produced. These credits can be sold or traded to other companies that have not met their required goals through online trading sites such as the Flett Exchange.

For example, the solar field at Ingram’s Mill is anticipated to produce 1,280 SRECs in its first year of operation. At the current ‘spot’ market value of $325 per SREC, its total SREC value for the year is projected to be $416,000. 

 

For More Information:

Aqua Sustainability Report

 

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